fbpx
Facebook
Call us: (208) 263-6300

Measles Protocol

 

There has been a lot of information in the news lately regarding the current measles outbreak. Given the recent case in Latah county, it is important to be informed.

 

Measles is very contagious. The virus can be spread for 4 days prior to the rash. Droplets from any patient with active disease can stay airborne for 2 hours. Initially, measles will show as “a bad cold” or “pinkeye” with fever, runny nose, red eyes.

 

If you believe that you or your child has been exposed and is showing symptoms, we ask that you first contact our office, and not bring the ill person into waiting room. We will see and care for your or your child, but have precautions in place that need to be followed for the safety of all our patients.

 

Call ahead and set up an appointment. When you get to the office – stay in your car and let the staff know you have arrived. Staff will come to you, give you protective masks, and escort you to a private room with isolation precautions.

 

While the majority of children with measles have minimal disease, there is a high risk of pneumonia, ear infection, brain infection and prolonged immune system depression.

 

Our best defense is still immunization and now isolation of any possibly infected persons.

 

A special message to our unimmunized families:

We respect your right to choose not to immunize yourself or your child. We ask that you also respect the right of families who do choose to immunize and are unable to fully immunize due to age, underlying illness or complications. If you have concerns about your child’s possibly being exposed to measles, please quarantine your child for 5-7 days. If you are concerned about progression of disease and worrisome symptoms, please follow the precautions outlined above so we can see and care for your child.

 

For an update on the current outbreak:

https://www.cdc.gov/measles/cases-outbreaks.html

For information regarding the MMR vaccine:

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mmr/public/index.html

Informative article on the history of measles:

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/20/us/measles-outbreak.html